The Right Light For Bathrooms

The bathroom is the part of the house with the densest assortment of materials and finishes, says Dan Blitzer, an educator for the American Lighting Association.

June 01, 2002

 

The bathroom is the part of the house with the densest assortment of materials and finishes, says Dan Blitzer, an educator for the American Lighting Association. “You have wall tile, floor tile, shower tile, faucet hardware, towel bars, wallpaper and paint all in a small space. You want everything to coordinate so that anyone walking in views the room as a whole. Everything should work together as opposed to supporting one astonishing fixture.”

To that end, the ALA offers these 10 lighting tips for today’s more complex bathrooms:

 

  •  Lighting in the shower stall should be bright enough to help prevent spills while making shaving and shampooing easier.
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  • Tubs need good general light, which can be provided by a recessed fixture. To avoid glare, aim the beam at the tub’s outside edge.
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  •  Windows provide natural light that supplements or replaces electric options.
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  •  Create a night light by illuminating the floor in the toe space below vanities and cabinets with a linear lighting system.
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  • Indirect or cove lighting adds a soft, warm glow.
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  •  Good mirror lighting, such as that provided by fluorescent vertical wall sconces, illuminates faces evenly, eliminating dark circles and shadows.
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  • A halogen light above the vanity provides cross-illumination when used with wall sconces.
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  • Lamps on tables, vanities or the islands found in large bathrooms add a soft, human touch.
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  •  A decorative fixture suspended from the ceiling adds elegance.
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  • Focused flood or halogen fixtures over the commode provide good light for reading.

    For more information or to find a lighting showroom near you, visit www.americanlightingassoc.com or call 800/274-4484.

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