Tradition-Bound

This 4,400-square-foot custom home borrows from the builder’s love of traditional period homes of the 1920s both outside and inside.

May 01, 2002

 

This custom home set on a large lot dotted with mature shade trees and a totally private expanse of back yard looks as if it might have been here for years.
Its masonry details, grand roof lines, copper accents and divided-light windows lend an established air to the new, 4,400-square-foot home built for a young family.
The rear of the home is as impressive as the front elevation, with several large windows capturing views and a multilevel deck and patio providing plenty of room for entertaining.

Designed and built by Ed Saloga for his young family, this 4,400-square-foot custom home borrows from the builder’s love of traditional period homes of the 1920s both outside and inside.

Masonry details on the front exterior combine with decorative shutters and copper accents to create an old-world feel for this thoroughly modern home. The copper-covered cupola rising from the roof interrupts the extended roof line and balances the height of the chimney. Windows on all four sides allow light to enter interior spaces and serve as a beacon in the darkness. Four roof gables of varying heights unite the expansive front elevation.

Cedar siding on the rear elevation lends a casual elegance to the outside living/entertaining space. A multi-level yard and deck provide plenty of play space for the two children in the family.

Style of Home | Traditional

Location | Sugar Grove, Ill.

Total Square Footage | 4,400

Market Value | $1 million

Designer/Architect | Ed Saloga Design/Build, Sugar Grove

Builder | Ed Saloga Builders, Sugar Grove

Target Market | Families with children

Major Products Used | Doors and Windows: Kolbe & Kolbe | Roofing: cedar | Siding: Skookum cedar

Period Places

 

 

 

  • To carry the exterior’s traditional architecture inside, the home features many design elements common in the early 1900s — built-in shelves, window seats, a wide U-shaped stairway and elaborate trim details.
  •  

     

     

  • The hearth room — and the home’s three other fireplaces — feature the same masonry details that grace the exterior of the home. One-hundred-fifty-year-old pine timbers and an abundance of divided-light windows make this room the gathering spot for family and friends.
  •  

     

     

  • In the formal dining room, wainscoting lends an old-world feel to the space, in much the same way the warm maple finish on the cabinets does in the kitchen.
  • Comments on: "Tradition-Bound"

    September 2014

    This Month in Custom Builder

    Products

    Despite the traditional clay or cement roof-tile look, Green Hybrid Roofing (GHR) actually has a foam core.

    Features

    Three award-winning architects and designers share how they transform water elements in and around the home into distinct custom looks.

    Email Subscriptions