East Coast Treasure

Recognizing a diamond in the rough, builder Patrick Moeller constructed a million-dollar custom home on a 7500-square-foot site along the shoreline in Beach Haven Park, N.J., transforming an undesirable lot into a beachfront gem.

September 01, 1999

Recognizing a diamond in the rough, builder Patrick Moeller constructed a million-dollar custom home on a 7500-square-foot site along the shoreline in Beach Haven Park, N.J., transforming an undesirable lot into a beachfront gem.

 

Casting its view out over the Atlantic Ocean, this $1 million New Jersey home features an asymmetrical exterior design, dramatically deep overhangs, and the massed windows and doors that stretch across the back of the home all classic shingle features. Vinyl siding keeps maintenance to a minimum.

Designed by architect William Tagland, the home’s shingle-style exterior evokes the stately style of the19th century mid-Atlantic seaside cottage retreats of the wealthy.

Moeller worked closely with Tagland, who designed this 4700-square-foot home to make the most of its on-the-water location by concentrating views and recreation space toward the water out the back of the home.

This luxury home, though, is finished with vinyl siding, rather than the classic shake shingle cladding-a rather unusual, yet deliberate, choice for a home in the $1 million price range. Moeller opts for this type of exterior finish on his custom projects, he says, for the convenience of his clients who are primarily wealthy retirees from the area, looking for luxury-yet very low maintenance vacation homes. And they love it!

The homesite, sandwiched between a high-traffic boulevard and the Atlantic seashore, presented Moller, with a challenge-how to design and build a home which afforded his retiree clients with a relaxing vacation retreat that offered them plenty of privacy in a high density setting.

And, with five adult daughters and their families coming for frequent visits, it was necessary for the home to be adaptable enough to accommodate a multitude of guests of all ages.

"We used a minimal amount of windows on the entry elevation of the home," says Moller, "and most of those were the fixed-glass type." The builder also used heavier insulation on the street side of the house in order to create a more effective sound barrier.

Inside, the home features an exceptionally bright, open floorplan which revolves around a dramatic, view-oriented two-story living space. The multi-level floorplan is designed with the master suite on the main floor along with the kitchen, living and dining rooms. This allows the owners to opt for single-floor living when it’s just the two of them.

 

The living areas interact well together in the home’s open floor plan. Shown here, a central gallery links the formal foyer and great room, both of which feature soaring ceilings, separated by a loft overlook above. The kitchen features Shaker-style maple cabinets which blend with the maple floors.

Four additional bedrooms and two full baths are located on a separate mid-level wing and the second floor, providing plenty of space for visitors. The home is designed with three independently operated heating and air-conditioning zones.

"This home works well for two people or a large crowd. There is plenty of space for everyone to spread out," says Moeller.

Located on a barrier island off the central coast of New Jersey, the home has no basement, but is built on pylons. A two level terrace, constructed of a combination of cedar, recycled decking, and brick pavers, creates an extensive outdoor recreation area along the beachfront. Two outdoor showers eliminate sand being tracked into the house.

Hard costs for the $950,000 home, which was completed in August 1998, were $150 per square foot.

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