Soaking Up The Sun

In Sacramento, Calif., home owners can generate their own electricity on cloudy and cold winter days. On sunny day, these same home owners generate nearly all the power needed to meet their home energy needs. Local builders have partnered with the Sacramento Municipal Utility District to develop Zero Energy Homes, which feature the latest in energy efficiency equipment, tighter building standar...

January 01, 2005







Flat-roof photovoltaic mounting system eliminate the need for roof penetrations and ballast the photovoltaic system helps reduce home energy bills by 60 percent.


In Sacramento, Calif., home owners can generate their own electricity on cloudy and cold winter days. On sunny days, these same home owners generate nearly all the power needed to meet their home energy needs.


Local builders have partnered with the Sacramento Municipal Utility District to develop Zero Energy Homes, which feature the latest in energy efficiency equipment, tighter building standards and solar tile roofs to generate electricity. At Premier Gardens, built by Premier Homes, the solar roof tiles are reducing annual energy bills by as much as 60 percent. For example, summer energy bills show charges ranging from $30 per month to zero to credits when excess electricity was sold back to the utility.


The Zero Energy Home features:

  • a 2-kilowatt solar electric system,
  • energy efficient appliances, lighting and HVAC, including low air infiltration,
  • Energy Star windows,
  • a 90 percent efficient furnace,
  • heating and cooling ducts buried in attic insulation,
  • a tankless water heater with .82 energy factor and
  • fluorescent lighting.


Key for both the builders who participate in the Utility's Zero Energy Home program and the home buyers is the ability to offer these homes at prices close to those built without built-in solar power.
For more information on the technology visit www.smud.org.


Comments on: "Soaking Up The Sun"

September 2014

This Month in Custom Builder

Products

Despite the traditional clay or cement roof-tile look, Green Hybrid Roofing (GHR) actually has a foam core.

Features

Three award-winning architects and designers share how they transform water elements in and around the home into distinct custom looks.

Email Subscriptions